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Anything Goes - Celebrating the 20s

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fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Kempinski’s Haus Vaterland: Weimar Republic cabaret, Germany 1930s.
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fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Kempinski’s Haus Vaterland: Weimar Republic cabaret, Germany 1930s.

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James Northfield Australian 1887-1973
Australia - A Place In The Sun!, c1929. Colour process lithograph, booklet cover, signed in image lower right, 22.9 x 20.2cm. Repaired old fold, minor foxing to margins. Linen-backed. For sale at the Josef Lebovic Gallery.
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James Northfield Australian 1887-1973
Australia - A Place In The Sun!, c1929. Colour process lithograph, booklet cover, signed in image lower right, 22.9 x 20.2cm. Repaired old fold, minor foxing to margins. Linen-backed. For sale at the Josef Lebovic Gallery.

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Sweet Ella May, 1920s sheet music
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Sweet Ella May, 1920s sheet music

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Ziegfeld Girl Anne Pennington
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Ziegfeld Girl Anne Pennington

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French advertising poster, 1920s sold through Josef Lebovic Gallery.
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French advertising poster, 1920s sold through Josef Lebovic Gallery.

(Source: joseflebovicgallery.com)

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Portrait of a young African-American woman c. 1910 taken in Metropolis, Illinois.
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Portrait of a young African-American woman c. 1910 taken in Metropolis, Illinois.

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Photograph from the Virginia State University Special Collections & Archives. These are the first African American women of Ettrick, Virginia to vote after passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920. They are all members of the Virginia State University faculty, then called the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute.
Front row left to right: Mary Branch, Anna Lindsay, Edna Colson, Edwina Wright, Johnella Frazer (Jackson), and Nannie Nichols; Back row from left to right; Eva Conner, Evie Carpenter (Spencer), and Odelle Green. Taken outside the Ettrick Court House.
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Photograph from the Virginia State University Special Collections & Archives. These are the first African American women of Ettrick, Virginia to vote after passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920. They are all members of the Virginia State University faculty, then called the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute.

Front row left to right: Mary Branch, Anna Lindsay, Edna Colson, Edwina Wright, Johnella Frazer (Jackson), and Nannie Nichols; Back row from left to right; Eva Conner, Evie Carpenter (Spencer), and Odelle Green. Taken outside the Ettrick Court House.

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il-tenore-regina:

"women didn’t get the right to vote till 1920"

WHITE WOMEN. 

"what?"

WHITE WOMEN.

"what do you mea—?"

WHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIITE

WOMEN. 

Black women technically received the right to vote at the same time as white women in the US (I assume this statement is about the USA) and after they were enfranchised in 1920, large numbers of black women did register to vote (in Florida, more black than white women registered). You had black women actively involved in the democratic process like Anna Simms Banks, who - after the 19th amendment was passed - was a fully credited delegate at the 7th Congressional District Republican Convention in Kentucky. Of course, having the right to vote in law doesn’t mean that an oppressive society will allow you to exercise that right, and - particularly in Southern states - as black women (like black men) increasingly sought to participate in democratic processes, other means of voter suppression were put in place (new tests - like reading and interpreting the constitution, long lines for black voter registration etc). ETA: I wrote 16th Amendment instead of 19th because I’m an idiot. Although no one has picked up on it yet, it’s too late for a sneaky edit ;)

(via youarekillianmehugh)

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kittyinva:

Kittyinva: Late 1920’s. “For those who are puzzled by what to wear when planning a flying trip Dorothy Sebastian suggests a suit of bottle green leather for the open plane. Her suit shows a Russian blouse, buttoned down the side and belted, trousers that are held in by straps at the ankles and a matching helmet. Sturdy leather shoes and goggles complete the costume.” From A Certain Cinema.
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kittyinva:

Kittyinva: Late 1920’s. “For those who are puzzled by what to wear when planning a flying trip Dorothy Sebastian suggests a suit of bottle green leather for the open plane. Her suit shows a Russian blouse, buttoned down the side and belted, trousers that are held in by straps at the ankles and a matching helmet. Sturdy leather shoes and goggles complete the costume.” From A Certain Cinema.

(via melancholyflapper)

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